COVID-19 Vaccine

COVID-19 Vaccine Phased Distribution

Am I Eligible to Get the COVID-19 Vaccine?

As of January 11, 2021, New Yorkers in Phase 1a and segments of Phase 1b of the state's distribution process are eligible for the vaccines. Please visit the New York State (NYS) COVID-19 vaccine page for more information and resources, including which New Yorkers are currently eligible, an online form that checks your eligibility and provides vaccination locations (note that depending on the county you live in, there may not currently be any scheduled clinics for Phase 1b), and the online NYS COVID-19 vaccine form – which must be completed after scheduling your first vaccination appointment. These pages will be updated regularly, so check back for the most up-to-date information on eligibility guidelines and vaccination clinics.

Updated Eligibility Guidelines:

Effective February 15, 2021, NYS will expand COVID-19 vaccine eligibility to individuals with underlying conditions. Review our announcement about this updated guidance, which includes NYS' criteria for underlying conditions / which conditions are eligible, how to retrieve documentation about your underlying condition through MyBassett Health Connection, and how to sign up for MyBassett online if you are not already enrolled.

On January 12, 2021, NYS expanded COVID-19 vaccine eligibility to people aged 65 and older.

On January 11, 2021, NYS announced that in-person college instructors / faculty are now eligible to receive the COVID-19 vaccine.

According to the official NYS website, it could take weeks to months for eligible New Yorkers to schedule a vaccination appointment due to a limited supply from the federal government. We encourage you to use the NYS online vaccine clinic finder tool frequently to check for updated vaccination clinics near you.

COVID-19 Vaccination Clinics

If you are currently eligible under Phases 1a or 1b, check below to see if we currently have any open vaccination clinics, or call the COVID-19 Vaccination Hotline for assistance in scheduling an appointment near you: 1-833-NYS-4-VAX (1-833-697-4829). Remember to complete the required NYS COVID-19 vaccine form after scheduling your first appointment.

Please be advised that Bassett Healthcare Network has a limited supply of COVID-19 vaccines. When more vaccines become available from NYS, we will update the state’s scheduling portal for Bassett locations authorized as a vaccination site. Please continue to visit our website for updates on our vaccination clinics as they become available.

Steps for Making a Vaccination Appointment

While our current vaccination clinics are fully booked, please continue to check this page for updates. If we have any clinics open, we will list them under step 2 below. According to the official NYS website, it could take weeks to months for eligible New Yorkers to schedule a vaccination appointment due to a limited supply from the federal government. Use the NYS online vaccine clinic finder tool to locate vaccination clinics in your county, or follow the steps outlined below to locate Bassett Healthcare Network vaccination clinics.

If you are currently eligible and are looking to schedule a vaccination appointment with Bassett, follow the below steps: 

  1. Continue checking this page for information regarding vaccine supply and vaccination clinics. You may also want to check your county health department website, as health departments and pharmacies may receive a supply of the COVID-19 vaccine sooner.
  2. Once Bassett does receive a supply of the COVID-19 vaccine for eligible individuals, we will list the scheduling information below, which you may use to schedule an appointment.
  3. Once you have scheduled your first vaccination appointment, complete the required online NYS COVID-19 vaccine form.

Proof of eligibility is required at all vaccination clinics. According to the official website of NYS, this proof may include an employee ID card, a letter from an employer or affiliated organization, or a pay stub, depending on the specific priority status. If you are eligible due to age, you should bring a form of ID (like a Driver's License or passport) that includes your date of birth.

After You've Been Vaccinated

After you've been given your first dose of the vaccine, register with CDC's v-safe to let the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) know about any side effects you may experience. V-safe is a smartphone-based tool that checks in on you after your COVID-19 vaccination. Your participation helps keep COVID-19 vaccines safe – for you and for everyone.

If you've been vaccinated in the last six weeks, you can participate in v-safe. Learn more about v-safe from the CDC.

Which Group is Next in the Phased Distribution Plan?

It is expected that as vaccine availability increases, vaccination recommendations will expand to include more groups. Visit your county's website, the New York State Department of Health (NYSDOH) or CDC websites, or this page for updates as they become available.

 

Bassett Healthcare Network's COVID-19 Vaccine Distribution

As of January 27, 2021, Bassett Healthcare Network has vaccinated over 5,000 health care workers, including 3,500 network staff. We are following guidance from the NYSDOH and the CDC regarding vaccine distribution, and will update this page as soon as we are able to expand our distribution.

We are working hand-in-hand with our county and state health departments and other regional health partners to prepare for the general population phase of the vaccine distribution process.

In the meantime, it is important to understand that the vaccines will not give you COVID-19. A vaccine works by teaching our immune systems how to recognize and fight off a virus if we ever truly encounter it. The vaccines are safe, research is proving their effectiveness, and they're one of the many steps that we can take together to protect ourselves and our loved ones.

Learn more about the COVID-19 vaccines from the NYSDOH and the CDC.

 

Facts About COVID-19 Vaccines

The FDA has authorized the emergency use of the Pfizer-BioNTech and Moderna vaccines to prevent COVID-19 in individuals 16 years of age and older (Pfizer) and 18 years of age and older (Moderna) under an Emergency Use Authorization.

Having the facts about these vaccines will help you and your family make informed decisions once the vaccines are available to the public:

 

COVID-19 Vaccine FAQs

NYSDOH and the CDC and offer many great answers to frequently asked questions about the vaccines. Listed here are a few of the most commonly asked questions. For more information, please visit the CDC and NYSDOH FAQ pages:

Yes, both the Moderna and Pfizer/BioNTech vaccines are safe and effective. Both manufacturers report that their vaccines are about 95% effective at preventing mild and severe symptoms of COVID-19. 

After a COVID-19 vaccine is authorized or approved for use by the FDA, many vaccine safety monitoring systems watch for adverse events (possible side effects). This ongoing monitoring can pick up on adverse events that may not have been seen in clinical trials. If an unexpected adverse event is seen, experts quickly study it further to see if it is a true safety concern. Experts then decide whether changes are needed in US vaccine recommendations.

In NYS, an added level of review was established to ensure the vaccine's safety. Following FDA approval, experts on NYS's independent COVID-19 Vaccine Clinical Advisory Task Force thoroughly reviewed the vaccine research. As of December 18, 2020, two COVID-19 vaccines have currently been approved by both the FDA and NYS's independent Clinical Advisory Task Force: the Pfizer/BioNTech vaccine and the Moderna vaccine.

No. Neither of the vaccines are made up of materials that can cause disease.

Both the Pfizer/BioNTech vaccine and the Moderna vaccine use a small, harmless part of the virus’s genetic material called mRNA. This is not the virus. mRNA is a spike protein, and mRNA vaccines teach our bodies to create virus proteins. Our immune systems develop antibodies against these proteins to help us fight the virus that causes COVID-19, if we become exposed to it. This called an immune response.

As with any vaccine, you may experience some symptoms after receiving the shot. This is also an immune response, and is how we know the vaccine is working. The most common after-vaccination symptoms include a sore arm where you received the shot, headache, chills, fever, or fatigue. These symptoms shouldn't last for more than a day or two, and over-the-counter pain relievers / fever reducers may help.

Yes, you do.

The CDC recommends that you get vaccinated even if you have already had COVID-19, because you can catch it more than once. While your exposure may have created some short-term antibody protection from COVID-19, we don’t know how long this protection will last. Getting vaccinated is the best way to give your body the tools it needs to defend against the virus that causes COVID-19.

There are many factors that combined to allow the COVID-19 vaccines to be developed quickly and safely:

  • The virus that causes COVID-19 is similar to other existing viruses, giving researchers a head start on developing a vaccine.
  • Research about the new virus was shared almost immediately with scientists all over the world, allowing vaccine work to begin right away.
  • Some researchers were able to run phase one and phase two trials at the same time.
  • The studies on COVID-19 included a larger amount of people than other recent vaccine trials, meaning there were a larger number of people in the trials over a shorter period of time.
  • The federal government allowed manufacturing of the most promising vaccines to begin while the studies were ongoing.

It’s important to note that all vaccine developers are required to go through each stage of the development process and meet all safety and efficacy standards. Learn about the many steps in the typical vaccine testing and approval process from the CDC.

Many vaccines, not just the Moderna and Pfizer/BioNTech COVID-19 vaccines, require two doses in order to provide the most protection that the vaccine has to offer. Like other vaccines, the first dose of the COVID-19 vaccine starts building protection. A second dose, given a few weeks later, offers a greater level of protection against the virus that causes COVID-19.

Vaccines that typically require two or more doses include those that are given to individuals for the first time – including their first flu shots, hepatitis B, diphtheria, and tetanus. Since COVID-19 is a new disease, we all need two doses of the vaccine to build up our protection against the virus. Visit the CDC's understanding mRNA COVID-19 vaccines page for more information.

NYS's “Am I Eligible?" App is not meant to be a 'final say' in whether or not someone will or will not receive the vaccine. If you believe you are in one of the current eligible categories (Phases 1a or 1b), you can call the New York State COVID-19 Vaccination Hotline at 1-833-NYS-4-VAX (1-833-697-4829).

After scheduling their first vaccination appointment, all New Yorkers must complete the NYS COVID-19 Vaccine Form, which includes a self-attestation under penalty of law that the individual is a member of one of the current eligible groups for vaccination.

Due to limited supply from the federal government, it could take weeks to months for eligible New Yorkers to schedule a vaccination appointment. As supply increases, there will be more appointments available in your county.

Check these links frequently for updates, as well as your county's website:

Proof of eligibility is required at all vaccination clinics. According to the official website of NYS, this proof may include an employee ID card, a letter from an employer or affiliated organization, or a pay stub, depending on the specific priority status. If you are eligible due to age, you should bring a form of ID (like a Driver's License or passport) that includes your date of birth.

Yes, proof of eligibility is required at all vaccination clinics. According to the official website of NYS, this proof may include an employee ID card, a letter from an employer or affiliated organization, or a pay stub, depending on the specific priority status. If you are eligible due to age, you should bring a form of ID (like a Driver's License or passport) that includes your date of birth.

Yes. You will need to continue to wear a mask and practice social distancing / good hand-hygiene for the foreseeable future as the vaccine gets rolled out in phases.

If you'd like to help with the current research surrounding the COVID-19 vaccines, there's a very easy way you can! After you've been given your first dose of the vaccine, register with CDC's v-safe to record any side effects you may experience. V-safe is a smartphone-based tool that checks in on you after your COVID-19 vaccination. If you've been vaccinated in the last six weeks, you can participate in v-safe. Learn more about v-safe from the CDC.

Another way you can help is by becoming a vaccinator! If you're interested in becoming a vaccinator, visit the NYS vaccination training page to learn more.

Lastly, the best way you can continue to help stop the spread of COVID-19 is to continue to wear a mask, social distance, and practice good hand hygiene.