COVID-19 Vaccine

Community Flu, COVID-19 Booster, & Pediatric Vaccine Clinics

Take a look at our upcoming community vaccination clinics to learn which vaccines will be offered, and schedule an appointment at the location nearest you!

For COVID-19 vaccine clinics, please print and fill out our COVID-19 Immunization Screening & Consent form, and bring this completed form, as well as your COVID-19 vaccination card and prescription insurance cards, to the clinic.

Edmeston Central School

January 15: 9:00am — 1:00pm - POSTPONED UNTIL A LATER DATE

Adult & Pediatric COVID-19 Vaccine & Flu Shot Clinic. No Appointments Required.

Adult Pfizer & Moderna COVID-19 1st, 2nd, & booster doses available. Pediatric Pfizer COVID-19 1st & 2nd doses also available. Flu shots available to all. Open to the public.

Bassett Hamilton-Madison Health Center (1055 Madison Marketplace, Hamilton)

January 29: 8:00am — 1:00pm

Adult COVID-19 Vaccines Clinic. No Appointments Required.

Adult Moderna COVID-19 second shots, booster shots, and third doses available. Open to the public, ages 18 and older. You do not need to be a Bassett patient. 

Bassett Hamilton-Madison Health Center (1055 Madison Marketplace, Hamilton)

February 5: 8:00am — 1:00pm

Pediatric COVID-19 Vaccine Clinic. No Appointments Required.

Pediatric Pfizer COVID-19 second dose shots available. Open to the public, ages 5-11. You do not need to be a Bassett patient. 

Bassett Hamilton-Madison Health Center (1055 Madison Marketplace, Hamilton)

February 12: 8:00am — 1:00pm

Adult COVID-19 Vaccine Clinic. No Appointments Required.

Adult Moderna COVID-19 second shots, booster shots, and third doses available. Open to the public, ages 18 and older. You do not need to be a Bassett patient. 

 

Third Doses:

Bassett Healthcare Network’s clinics are also offering third vaccine doses of Pfizer and Moderna. Right now, the CDC has authorized third doses only for patients with moderately to severely compromised immune systems. For these patients, three doses are considered full vaccination. 

This includes people who are:

  • Receiving active cancer treatment for tumors or cancers of the blood
  • Recipients of an organ transplant and are taking medication to suppress the immune system to prevent rejection 
  • Recipients of a stem cell transplant within the last two years and are on medication to suppress the immune system
  • Living with moderate or severe primary immunodeficiency (such as DiGeorge syndrome or Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome)
  • Living with advanced or untreated HIV/AIDS
  • Receiving active treatment with high-dose corticosteroids or other medications that may suppress the immune system 

Ask your practitioner about whether getting a third COVID-19 vaccine dose is appropriate for you.
 

After You've Been Vaccinated

Register with the CDC's v-safe app

After you've been given your first dose of the vaccine, register with the CDC's v-safe to let the CDC know about any side effects you may experience. V-safe is a smartphone-based tool that checks in on you after your COVID-19 vaccination. Your participation helps keep COVID-19 vaccines safe – for you and for everyone.

If you've been vaccinated in the last six weeks, you can participate in v-safe. Learn more about v-safe from the CDC.

Get your NYS Excelsior Travel Pass

The NYS Excelsior Pass provides a free, fast, and secure way to present digital proof of COVID-19 vaccination or negative test results. If you've received your COVID-19 vaccine from Bassett Healthcare Network, call to obtain your NYS Excelsior Travel Pass: (607) 322-0910

Facts About COVID-19 Vaccines

The FDA has fully authorized the use of Comirnaty (also known as Pfizer-BioNTech). Moderna and Johnson & Johnson (J&J /Janssen) are under emergency authorization. 

Having the facts about these vaccines will help you and your family make informed decisions:

COVID-19 Vaccine FAQs

The NYSDOH and the CDC offer many great answers to frequently asked questions about the vaccines. Listed here are a few of the most commonly asked questions. For more information, please visit the CDC and NYSDOH FAQ pages:

Yes, each of the vaccines are safe and effective.

After a COVID-19 vaccine is authorized or approved for use by the FDA, many vaccine safety monitoring systems watch for adverse events (possible side effects). This ongoing monitoring can pick up on adverse events that may not have been seen in clinical trials. If an unexpected adverse event is seen, experts quickly study it further to see if it is a true safety concern. Experts then decide whether changes are needed in US vaccine recommendations.

In NYS, an added level of review was established to ensure the safety of each. Following FDA approval, experts on NYS's independent COVID-19 Vaccine Clinical Advisory Task Force thoroughly reviewed the vaccine research. On December 10, 2020, the Clinical Advisory Task Force unanimously recommended the COVID-19 vaccine developed by Pfizer and BioNTech. On December 18, 2020, the Task Force unanimously recommended the COVID-19 vaccine developed by Moderna. On March 1, 2021, the Task Force unanimously recommended the COVID-19 vaccine developed by Johnson & Johnson.

On August 23, 2021, the FDA approved the first COVID-19 vaccine. The vaccine has been known as the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 Vaccine, and will now be marketed as Comirnaty, for the prevention of COVID-19 disease in individuals 16 years of age and older. The vaccine also continues to be available under emergency use authorization (EUA), including for individuals 12 through 15 years of age and for the administration of a third dose in certain immunocompromised individuals.

No. None of the vaccines are made up of materials that can cause disease.

Both the Pfizer/BioNTech vaccine and the Moderna vaccine use a small, harmless part of the virus’s genetic material called mRNA. This is not the virus. mRNA is a spike protein, and mRNA vaccines teach our bodies to create virus proteins. Our immune systems develop antibodies against these proteins to help us fight the virus that causes COVID-19, if we become exposed to it. This called an immune response.

The Johnson & Johnson (J&J / Janssen) vaccine is a viral vector vaccine. Rather than mRNA, it uses the harmless "adenovirus" as a vehicle to introduce the coronavirus's genetic material to your immune system. The adenovirus inserts the material into your cells to produce the distinctive coronavirus protein, much like the mRNA vaccines. This again creates the coronavirus protein to be shown to your immune system, triggering the immune response that teaches your body to create antibodies to help us fight the virus that causes COVID-19, if we become exposed to it.

As with any vaccine, you may experience some symptoms after receiving the shot. This is also an immune response, and is how we know the vaccine is working. The most common after-vaccination symptoms include a sore arm where you received the shot, headache, chills, fever, or fatigue. These symptoms shouldn't last for more than a day or two, and over-the-counter pain relievers / fever reducers may help.

Yes, you do.

The CDC recommends that you get vaccinated even if you have already had COVID-19. While your exposure may have created some short-term antibody protection from COVID-19, the protection the vaccines offer has been proven to be longer lasting, and offers more protection against variants of COVID-19. Getting vaccinated is the best way to give your body the tools it needs to defend against the virus that causes COVID-19.

There are many factors that combined to allow the COVID-19 vaccines to be developed quickly and safely:

  • The virus that causes COVID-19 is similar to other existing viruses, giving researchers a head start on developing a vaccine.
  • Research about the new virus was shared almost immediately with scientists all over the world, allowing vaccine work to begin right away.
  • Some researchers were able to run phase one and phase two trials at the same time.
  • The studies on COVID-19 included a larger amount of people than other recent vaccine trials, meaning there were a larger number of people in the trials over a shorter period of time.
  • The federal government allowed manufacturing of the most promising vaccines to begin while the studies were ongoing.

It’s important to note that all vaccine developers are required to go through each stage of the development process and meet all safety and efficacy standards. Learn about the many steps in the typical vaccine testing and approval process from the CDC.

Many vaccines, not just the Moderna and Pfizer/BioNTech COVID-19 vaccines, require two doses in order to provide the most protection that the vaccine has to offer. Like other vaccines, the first dose of the COVID-19 vaccine starts building protection. A second dose, given a few weeks later, offers a greater level of protection against the virus that causes COVID-19.

Check the NYS online vaccine clinic finder tool frequently for updates, as well as your county's website, local pharmacy websites, and this webpage.

You may also choose to call the NYSDOH COVID-19 Vaccination Hotline at 1-833-NYS-4-VAX (1-833-697-4829) for assistance scheduling an appointment.

Proof of eligibility is required at all vaccination clinics. Visit the official website of NYS for a list of acceptable forms of proof of eligibility. This information can be found in the "Vaccination Instructions" section. Please note that according to the NYSDOH, if you are under the age of 18 and have scheduled a Pfizer vaccination appointment, a parent or legal guardian must provide consent for vaccination. A parent or legal guardian must provide verbal consent either in person, or by phone, at the time of vaccine appointment.

Yes, proof of eligibility is required at all vaccination clinics. Visit the official website of NYS for a list of acceptable forms of proof of eligibility. This information can be found in the "Vaccination Instructions" section. Please note that according to the NYSDOH, if you are under the age of 18 and have scheduled a Pfizer vaccination appointment, a parent or legal guardian must provide consent for vaccination. A parent or legal guardian must provide verbal consent either in person, or by phone, at the time of vaccine appointment.

It is still recommended to wear a mask around others while you are out in public, even if you are vaccinated. Many stores and places of business will have signs outside their building detailing their individual mask policy. These policies often change based on the prevalence of COVID-19 in the area, so it is always recommended to bring a mask with you when you are leaving your home, just in case.

If you'd like to help with the current research surrounding the COVID-19 vaccines, there's a very easy way you can! After you've been given your first dose of the vaccine, register with CDC's v-safe to record any side effects you may experience. V-safe is a smartphone-based tool that checks in on you after your COVID-19 vaccination. If you've been vaccinated in the last six weeks, you can participate in v-safe. Learn more about v-safe from the CDC.

Another way you can help is by becoming a vaccinator! If you're interested in becoming a vaccinator, visit the NYS vaccination training page to learn more.

Lastly, the best way you can continue to help stop the spread of COVID-19 is to continue to wear a mask, social distance, and practice good hand hygiene.